From Reader to Writer of BDSM

My first foray into the BDSM genre was as a reader; coming across books by authors that had been doing it long before I even knew anything about it. The stories, or should I say the complexity of the relationship of the Dom/sub captivated me. I had always enjoyed English historical where the hero was dark, dangerous and commanding. I guess you could say I have a ‘type’ when it comes to the heroes I read and write.

My curiosity continued to grow and I found myself wanting to know more. Similar to a lot of others, I’m sure. I reached out to an author friend of mine, who was already writing the genre and she suggested that if I was interested in penning bondage stories I should attend a munch. When I asked her why, she explained to me that in order to write the stories well I needed to understand the people in the lifestyle. See ii for myself, touch things, hear the sounds within a scene and talk to people. Don’t go off your own assumptions. That turned out to be the best advice. It was in 2007 when I attended my first BDSM event and I still go to them throughout the year. I now have a network of friends in both the BDSM and Leather community. (Yes, there is a difference.)

Since my first story, Speed Dating to my Strong Blends series, I have grown to I love writing BDSM just as much as I enjoy writing shifters. Both of these genres deal with the intense alpha males. This is the same even if the hero is beta or submissive.  The second part is the error a lot of novice bondage authors make. Just because the heroine maybe the dominant in the story does not mean the hero needs to be weak or wimpy. This is a red flag to authors and readers showing a lack of respect and understanding of the lifestyle, a tale-tale sign the writer doesn’t understand the lifestyle.

In order to truly write the bondage genre, an author needs to immerse themselves in all things BDSM. Now, does that mean they need to begin to live the lifestyle? No. Some do. However, when you become a part of the bondage community it changes you, your perspective about your relationship and mentally at least you assign yourself a role—Dom or sub.

Also, a writer needs to be open to all the various dimensions of the lifestyle. BDSM is as simple as someone controlling what their submissive/slave eat or pinning them down during sex. It can also be as deep and intense as knife and fire play, or medical play. If an author has never witnessed or experienced some of the more extreme sides of BDSM or they are not communicating with an expert, I would suggest they steer clear of writing stories that may cause a reader to injury themselves or someone else attempting to follow the authors lead. Yes, you can put the “do not try this at home” clause at the beginning, but I’d say “do not try this between the sheets of a book if you only have research through the internet”. As an author we hold a great responsibility to what we put out to our readers and those readers that don’t email, FB message or Twitter us about our stories.

Lastly, I will say to any authors who would dare to pen bondage, erotic tales…have fun with it. Treat it just as you would a contemporary, suspense, fantasy or paranormal, but know your facts.

Check out her latest works! Just click on the covers and buy:

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ANNOUNCEMENT!:  Please join Yvette Hines and Bridget Midway for  the following BDSM event: 2013 Wrapped Up: A Corseted Event with Bridget Midway and Yvette Hines:

http://yvettehines.com/2013-wrapped-up-a-corseted-event-with-bridget-midway-and-yvette-hines/

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